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Business Strategy

The Definitive Guide to Storytelling for Business: The Art & Craft of Making Your Audience Fall in Love with You



As I unsubscribed my Dad from my email list, I remember thinking, “Please don’t let him find out.”

I’d shared a personal story about my Dad and I’d sent it out to my entire mailing list. I only had about 3,000 people on my list at the time (a fraction of what we have today), but it felt like the entire world.

It was the story of how my Dad planned out my whole life from the day I was born and raised me like I was my own economy.

Growing up, he shared 4 financial spreadsheets with me every month. Each sheet was a detailed account on what I was costing him for my education, my healthcare, my clothing and my allowance.

My Dad is a meticulous, world-class macroeconomic advisor and his spreadsheets were clear, precise, and error-free.

Looking back, I can even say those monthly spreadsheets helped me gain a better understanding about money…

But they didn’t make me feel loved or cherished.

As a child and later as a teenager and a young adult, I worked hard to please my Dad and I thought nothing of setting aside my own hopes and dreams just to hear him say, “I’m proud of you, Marisa.”

The thing is I love my Dad and I know he loves me but when when I was growing up it felt like the money and love flowed only as long as I listened to him and followed his plans.

I’d kept that story about me and Dad to myself for the longest time. I was afraid of what people would think. I was even more afraid of what my Dad would say.

Then, a few years ago, I attended Bo Eason’s workshop on the power of personal story.

Bo had me and the other students share our stories. These were stories we’d kept hidden. Stories we thought we didn’t have the guts to tell.

When it was my turn to get onstage, I told that story about my Dad. It was recorded, uploaded and shared on YouTube…

And my 9-minute act of courage received thousands of views.

That’s how Dad found out what I’d done, even though I’d unsubscribed him from my email list. I didn’t know what to expect when we met to talk about the whole thing but I promised myself that — no matter what — I’d be honest.

That conversation with Dad was the hardest I’ve ever had. We talked about our differences. We talked about our past, our present and our future.

When it was over, I felt completely drained but for the first time in my life, I felt like I knew my Dad even if I didn’t agree with him about so many things.

That experience led to a better, healthier father-daughter relationship than I’d dared to imagine and it wasn’t the only amazing thing that happened.

My story reverberated through my community and I was surprised and moved to tears when I started receiving loving, supportive messages and emails.

My audience understood and they stood by me. Some of them confessed they’d never felt connected to me until I told them about those spreadsheets.

And that’s the magic of storytelling.



Stories heal. Stories bring people together…

And when you use storytelling in your business, you’ll immediately start to build an authentic, meaningful relationship with your audience.

A relationship based on shared goals, values, dreams and desires. A relationship based on mutual understanding and most importantly…

Trust.

Your stories are at the heart of your message and you simply can’t Live Your Message without them.

But how do you write those stories? What are the types of stories you should share? How can you master business storytelling?

This post is the definite guide — a powerful masterclass — in storytelling for business.

If you’re ready to ignite inspiration and connect with every single person in your audience, I’m going to show you exactly how to do that with the power of story.

So grab your favorite beverage and let’s begin!

Don’t have time to read this game-changing guide right this minute? Click here to get the PDF version and read it anytime you want!


You’re a storyteller whether you think you are or not. When you share how your best client sent you a dozen roses as a thank you, you’re telling a story.

When you go online and post about your favorite weekend market in your city, you’re telling a story.

We instinctively know how to tell stories because we’re surrounded by stories… almost from the moment we’re born. You heard the stories your family told each other, when you were lying in your crib.

You mom and dad read you fairy tales of beautiful Princesses, witches and dragons when you were little.

Later when you could read on your own, you graduated to Twilight or the Harry Potter books (or maybe you’re like me and you belong to The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and A Wrinkle in Time generation!).

Every movie you watch is a story. You can even find stories in the lyrics of a song.

Most of these stories provide us with entertainment and interesting information.

But storytelling for business? How’s that different from all the other types of stories that surround us?

Think of it this way…

Business storytelling is about sharing your personal stories and other details about your expertise and what you do in your business, so your audience instantly gets who you are, what you stand for, how you want to contribute to the world and how you can help them.

Sharing stories in your business helps you communicate in a way that is persuasive, compelling and memorable. You’ll grab the spotlight and get heard over just about every other business in your niche or category.

Author of the Narnia Chronicles,  C.S. Lewis once said, “Friendship is born at the moment when one man says to another “What! You too?”

Stories create that “What! You too!” effect.They make you relatable and business storytelling helps your audience get to know the real you.

When you tell your stories, you’re inviting your audience to walk in your shoes. You’re sharing your experiences and you’re building an experience for those who hear your stories.

This creates an extraordinary emotional connection.

According to research by global consulting firm Capgemini’s Digital Transformation Institute, a staggering 82% of consumers buy from brands they feel emotionally connected to. This and other market research points to an undeniable truth: When customers and clients are emotionally invested in a product or service their brand loyalty knows no bounds.

And stories create that powerful emotional investment.

Heard of Warby Parker eyewear? It’s a highly successful brand powered by an authentic story.

In their own words, “Warby Parker was founded with a rebellious spirit and a lofty objective: To offer designer eyewear at a revolutionary price, while leading the way for socially conscious businesses…”

The Founders go on to explain that back in college, one of them lost his glasses on a backpacking trip and ended up struggling with blurred vision for an entire semester because he couldn’t afford to replace them.

Not long after that incident, the Founders discovered that the eyewear industry was dominated by a single company that kept costs high.

There were no alternatives and so they created one: Warby Parker.

This is an example of a powerful story that communicates:

  • heart (forced to live without prescriptive glasses because of financial issues)
  • courage (starting a company in an unknown industry)
  • and practicality (why pay more for glasses when you can pay less)…

All in just a few sentences.

This story packs an unforgettable punch. It builds emotional investment, inspires unshakeable brand loyalty…

And creates customers for life.

Don’t have time to read this game-changing guide right this minute? Click here to get the PDF version and read it anytime you want!


Not all business stories are created equal. There are:

  1. “Juicy” stories that benefit your audience and,
  2. “Junk” stories that don’t

In this Chapter, we’ll look at 3 key categories of “juicy” stories you can use in your business. These stories work well in both text and video formats.

Business Story Type #1: Origin Stories

Origin Stories are the collection of stories behind the birth of a business.

One of the best Origin Stories I’ve ever heard comes from billionaire Sara Blakely, inventor of Spanx, the wildly popular woman’s undergarment. Sara shares the story of how she landed her first account with Neiman Marcus when she personally demonstrated how well Spanx worked to smooth out bulgy undergarments… in the ladies room!

But don’t worry if you don’t have an unusual Origin Story like Sara’s. Powerful origin stories don’t have to be outlandish or strange. They just need to be authentic, clear and as vivid as possible (check Chapter 3 below to find out how to write a vivid story).

My personal Origin Story isn’t crazy or weird and I’ve received lots of positive comments, plus interest in my work because of it. Watch it below.

If you want to dive deeper with your Origin Story, include why you decided to help your clients and customers transform their lives with your unique expertise or genius (you might have noticed I did this with my own Origin Story in the video).

Think of it as your chance to share what you do and to either directly — or indirectly — communicate your beliefs, your values and your reasons for being in business.

My Mastery student, Iris Huebler, does this beautifully with her Origin Story. Watch it below.  

Where to Share

Everywhere! You can feature your story on the Home Page or About Page on your website and it can be a part of your personal introduction at business events. Origin Stories are also great in speeches and presentations because they create a powerful, emotional connection with your audience.

Kickstart Your Origin Story

Ask yourself these questions when you’re crafting your story:

>> What was an “a-ha” moment for me when I first started my business?

>> How do I want to help/contribute through my business?

>> What event/situation/experience motivated me to build a business?

You can also use these questions to write the Origin Story of a product or service.

Business Story Type #2: Success Stories

The winning experiences you’ve had in your business and the great results you’ve helped create for your clients…

They’re all part of your collection of Success Stories.

Many entrepreneurs have a ton of Success Stories to share but they hold back because they’re afraid to come across as vain or arrogant.

This is a big mistake because in business, Success Stories matter. A lot.

For one thing, they’re a powerful source of credibility. Potential clients know you’re more than capable of “walking your talk” because you’ve already created results for past clients.

My Mastery student Jesse wrote a memorable Personal Success Story when we worked together to create, what I like to call – a Credibility Video –  for his website.Take a look at his story below.

A favorite Client Success Story in my own business comes from a student who took my Experience Product Masterclass. Kat Walters is the Founder of Instagram Makeovers and she shared how EPM helped her generate a great income (Kat signed on 5 new clients and earned $3,000 during the 10-weeks of the program and since then she’s brought in $190,000 with her experience product!). Watch Kat tell her story in the video below.

Client Success Stories also provide social proof, which is one of the most powerful ways to influence new customers and clients to work with you or buy your products.

In a study published in the Washington Post, researchers learned that more people ended up saving energy by turning off their air conditioners and turning on their fans when they were told their neighbors had switched to using fans.

Researchers found that telling people what their neighbors were doing, was far more effective than telling people they could help protect the environment (greenhouse gases are released when you turn on air conditioning).

Even the prospect of saving money lost out to social proof!  

More people gave up air conditioning when they were told the Joneses next door were cooling off under a fan compared to when they were told they could save over $50 on their monthly utility bill.

Now that you know this, don’t let yourself miss out on the incredible persuasive power of Success Stories. Use them to attract clients and create strong interest in your work. Make sure you collect as many Success Stories as you can and share them as much as you can.

Where to Share

Client Success Stories can be shared as testimonials on your website, on your landing pages and sales pages, or on social media. You can also write them as blog posts, or as part of a presentation or speech. Success Stories also work well within the Origin Stories of your products and services (see Chapter 1).

Kickstart Your Personal/Client Success Story

Ask yourself these questions when you’re crafting your story:

>> How do I want to make a difference with my business?

>> What is the business achievement I’m most proud of?

>> What are tangible transformations/results I’ve created for clients in the past?

Business Story Type #3: Future Vision Stories

Back in the dark ages — also known as the 20th century — there was no such thing as a Future Vision Story.

All we had were “mission statements.”

A mission statement aimed to capture the objective of a company or organization. In general, mission statements were unemotional, uninspiring words that left most people bored and even more people confused.

Future Vision Stories do the opposite.

They inspire and enlighten your audience. Rather than a single “objective” or company goal, a Future Vision Story embraces everyone.

It paints a powerful picture of a different world, a better world.

A world you want to live in. Your Future Vision Story should include your highest ideals. It’s your chance to dream big.

Want to protect wildlife and save the animals on the extinction list? That’s a Future Vision Story. Want to provide clean water to every man, woman and child on the planet? That’s a Future Vision Story.

Sharing a Future Vision Story brings a powerful new dimension to your business. It attracts  kindred spirits, helps your audience reimagine tomorrow and creates a magnetic pull toward a brighter, better future for everyone.

One of my Mastery students, Dawn Thompson created what I call an “I Believe” video that includes a beautiful Future Vision Story. Dawn wants to live in a world where loving, supportive birth experiences for mothers everywhere is the norm… not the exception. Watch Dawn share her story below.

Where to Share

On your website and wherever you include your personal or company profile. Don’t hesitate to share your Future Vision Story with potential clients during sales calls or at networking events. This type of story can also be shared as a blog post or social media post.

Kickstart Your Future Vision Story

>> Fill in the blank: I believe____________

>> What is my favorite cause or charity?

>> What are the injustices/prejudices/discriminations I’d like to eradicate?

Don’t have time to read this game-changing guide right this minute? Click here to get the PDF version and read it anytime you want!


You don’t need to be a gifted writer to produce great stories. Storytelling for business is something you can learn to do.

In this Chapter, we’ll explore 5 elements, which are key writing styles and techniques found in all masterful stories — fiction and non-fiction. Include as many of these elements as you can to craft mesmerizing stories for your audience.

Don’t be discouraged if you find this hard to do at first (I know, I did!). Keep practicing and it will become second nature.

Element #1: Drop the Ego & Be Vulnerable

“They’ll think I’m stupid.”

“They’ll know I was fired. I’m so ashamed”

“I don’t want them to know I’m scared.”

This is the voice of the ego.

It’s the voice that keeps us playing safe and keeps our stories bland, unremarkable and 100% forgettable. Powerful stories are born when we are brave enough to be vulnerable but the ego keeps us locked in a prison of fearful silence.

Here’s what I want you to do…

The next time you feel hesitant about sharing a story, whether it’s a story about a failure, a difficult relationship, or an embarrassing outcome, I want you to think about how your words could help someone else or maybe even change a life.

Remember: it may be your story to tell but the moment you share it, it no longer belongs to you.

It belongs to the people who receive it.

The people you want to support. The people you want to serve.

This approach will motivate you to drop the voice of ego, adopt the voice of truth, and find the strength and courage to be vulnerable.

When you practice vulnerability you allow your audience to not just get to know, like and trust you but fall in love with you!

Element #2: Use Vivid Language

Clear, vivid language draws images in our minds. This is critical because we think in images. When your writing produces powerful mental imagery for your audience, they’ll continue to read, watch or listen to you…

And that’s exactly what you want!

In Hidden Story Power, my program about crafting powerful, authentic business stories, I share examples of vivid, descriptive language that creates clear mental images such as this:

Non-vivid language: My hard drive broke

Vivid language: My hard drive crashed.

Non-vivid language: I need more information

Vivid language: I need to drill down.

Non-Vivid language: She walked into the room

Vivid language: She strutted into the room.

Another technique that creates powerful images is the almighty metaphor.

A metaphor is a phrase that instantly calls up a clear, specific visual in the mind — a visual that symbolizes the meaning of your words.

Here’s a simple, effective example:

My 9-to-5 job felt like a prison sentence.

“Felt like a prison sentence” instantly communicates a clear mental image that evokes emotion. Metaphors are incredibly effective tools in your storytelling toolkit. Use them whenever you can.

Element #3: Engage All 5 Senses

Ever read an “unputdownable” book? It’s the book that keeps you up all night. A page-turner that you can’t put down.

Authors of all-nighter books know a secret that makes their writing irresistible — even addictive — they use sensory language to draw in their readers.

Business storytellers who mesmerize their audience do the same. They engage all 5 senses when they write.

Here are some examples:

Sight: I was dazzled by her confidence.

Sound: She dropped the microphone with a thump.

Taste: His feedback left me bitter.

Smell: Her coach said all the right things but there was something fishy going on.

Touch: His message was so sticky we remembered it a week later.

Engaging the senses makes your story come alive — a masterful strategy that’s guaranteed to captivate your audience.

Element #4: Get Specific

The age of the “all-knowing” expert or guru has come to an end. It’s time to get off the pedestal, stand among your people and lead from the crowd.

And the best way to do this is to get extremely specific with your stories.

So many entrepreneurs hold back from sharing truly remarkable business and personal stories and experiences because they believe, no one else will “get it” and that sharing specific stories will set them apart from their audience.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

When I shared the story about my Dad I received messages and emails like:

“Your Dad is just like mine.”

“You’ve inspired me to have an honest conversation with my Mom.”

“I know how you feel, Marisa”

My story was a personal and incredibly specific experience but so many people in my audience could relate because what I learned from master storyteller Bo Eason is true…

“The more specific your story, the more universal it becomes.”

Element #5: Show Don’t Tell

“Show Don’t Tell” is classic storytelling advice and it ties together many of the other elements I’ve just discussed.

Show Don’t Tell basically means you include emotions and colorful descriptions in your writing to create a rich, meaningful experience for your audience.

Here’s how that works:

Tell: Kate felt anxious about her speech.

Show: Kate felt her heart beating. Sweat was pouring down her back and her throat felt tight. She wondered if she’d be able to speak when it was time to give her speech.

Use “Show Don’t Tell” to create impactful moments in your business stories — moments when you want to create anticipation, excitement, and curiosity.

Showing your audience what you mean and not just telling them, gives your stories depth and emotional power. As I mentioned, emotion is everything when it comes to attracting lifelong clients and customers who love your products and services. 

Don’t have time to read this game-changing guide right this minute? Click here to get the PDF version and read it anytime you want!


“Guess what? I quit my job this morning when my boss yelled at me. Joel was in the room too. Remember Joel? You met him at last year’s Christmas party and he said you reminded him of his sister. Have you seen Joel’s sister, lately? She’s lost a lot of weight and she looks great. You know, I’ve been thinking of going on a diet…”

We all know people who can’t seem to get to the point when they tell a story verbally or on paper. These rambling storytellers make us want to run in the other direction when we see them coming.

It’s what happens when you don’t follow a clear story structure and flow.

In this Chapter we’ll talk about the 5-part ”movement” or flow and structure I teach in Hidden Story Power — the start, the build in, the middle, the turning point and the end.

You’ll learn how to begin your story with a bang and follow that with one of two options that build the drama and move your story forward in a powerful way.

Then it’s time for the heart of the story, an exciting, captivating  “middle”, which then leads into the turning point where you discover your solution.

Finally, you’ll learn how to end your story so your audience will feel seen, heard and deeply connected to you and your experience.

The Start: Cut to the Chase

This is about diving straight into the heart of the action — the essence of your story — right from the very beginning.  

Don’t be shy. Take your audience into the thick of things from the word “go.” It’s a proven way to immediately grab attention and motivate them to keep reading.

Most people lead into their stories with a whole bunch of unnecessary details that bore listeners from the start.

But when you go the theater and watch a great movie, what happens? It opens right in the thick of the action — the chase scene, the car crash, someone on their hospital bed, you name it.

You can find your “Cut to the Chase” opening by coming up with a moment when you experienced an important shift or change. It could be a profound experience that affected you, irreversibly. Your Cut to the Chase opening is usually a single, powerful statement, sentence or question.

I started this post with a “Cut to the Chase” moment of my own:

As I unsubscribed Dad from my email list, I remember thinking, “Please don’t let him find out!”

If you’re reading this right now, you know it worked on you — you just HAD to find out what happened next and so you kept reading!.

The Build In, Option 1: The Flash Forward

Now that you’ve opened with a “bang” you can use the Flash Forward structure to move further into your story.

Start by focusing on a defining moment or peak emotional experience. Tell the story of what happened in the past — what you saw, felt, heard and experienced. Then Flash Forward to the point you want to make to your audience. To maximize your impact with the Flash Forward structure, highlight challenges and struggles, along the way.

I used the Flash Forward at the start of this post when I wrote about a defining moment from my past:

Growing up, he shared 4 financial spreadsheets with me every month. Each sheet was a detailed account on what I was costing him for my education, my healthcare, my clothing and my allowance.

Then, I let the story unfold, naturally and highlighted more challenges and struggles:

As a child and later as a teenager and a young adult, I worked hard to please my Dad and I thought nothing of setting aside my own hopes and dreams just to hear him say, “I’m proud of you, Marisa.”

Finally, I use the “Flash Forward” to share the point that I wanted to make:

That experience led to a better, healthier father-daughter relationship than I’d dared to imagine and it wasn’t the only amazing thing that happened. My story reverberated through my community and I was surprised and moved to tears when I started receiving loving, supportive messages and emails. My audience understood and they stood by me. Some of them confessed they’d never felt connected to me until I told them about those spreadsheets. And that’s the magic of storytelling.

The Flash Forward structure is a dramatic way to guide your audience further into your story while keeping them riveted to the page or screen.

The Build In, Option 2: Flashback

Another great structure to dive deeper into your story is the Flashback. With this structure, you start with a specific situation, or experience. Then, take your audience back to the way it used to be before.

The Flashback often features transitional phrases such as “but it wasn’t always this way” or “things were different, back then.”

Here’s an example:

I stayed home, with the curtains drawn. I didn’t pick up when my friends called. I didn’t want anyone to know…

I was dead broke and I didn’t know what to do. I felt like a total loser and I didn’t think I’d ever climb back up again.

But it wasn’t always this way…

There was a time when I believed I could do anything. Other people believed that too…

I was great at my job and a rising star at the company where I worked. Even though it was my first job out of college, everyone thought I was headed straight to the top.

The Flashback takes your audience back to where you were before you had a transformational experience or before you found a solution to a problem.

Like the Flash Forward, the Flashback should highlight your struggles and challenges.

This structure is helpful when you want to provide context for your story when you’re giving a speech or hosting a webinar. A Flashback also works as a transition when you want to bridge into a story from another piece of content.

The Middle: Leading Up to the Turning Point

Now The Middle of your story is where you continue the action leading all the way up to the Turning Point.

The goal is to build tension through what’s called “rising” and “falling” action or mini-conflicts and resolutions that continue to disrupt the status quo leading up to a moment when things can’t get any worse and things have to change: the Turning Point of your story (see next section for details on The Turning Point).

Remember: There is no story without drama or tension.

In Rocky IV, you can’t feel the sheer jubilation of Rocky knocking out Ivan Drago in the final round without the series mini-conflicts that lead to his victory:

  • watching Drago kill Rocky’s best friend Apollo Creed in the ring
  • watching Rocky and Drago prepare for this epic fight for months
  • watching the crowd’s initial hostility to Rocky when the day finally comes
  • watching Rocky and Drago battle it out over a dozen brutal rounds
  • then watching the crowd start to rally around Rocky

So when the knockout comes in the final round, it feels like the you’ve experienced every step of the journey yourself…it’s real payoff not just of Rocky but for you too!

Use The Middle of your story to keep your audience immersed in the experience as they follow every breathtaking twist and turn. Build the drama and tension to a fevered pitch which you then release at the Turning Point… the final round.

The Turning Point: Sharing the Transformation

Now that you’ve taken your audience by the hand and led them through increasingly difficult moments, struggles and challenges, it’s time to share the answer, solution or lesson that you learned.

Here’s how Hidden Power of Story student, Andrea reached her turning point when the love of her life left her for someone else just before their pre-planned trip to Asia. They didn’t want to cancel the trip and Andrea ended up traveling with her ex… until she experienced a powerful turning point in Thailand:

One night we were sitting at the beach talking to some people we meet at a Full Moon Party. I shared with a girl from Berlin that I was traveling with my ex-boyfriend. She looked at me and told me with lots of reassurance in her voice. “Looking at you two, I know that you’ll get back together.” That did it. I knew in my heart that we would never get back together. The next morning I packed up my stuff and traveled to the next island by myself. I was finally “free”.

With The Turning Point, focus on sharing the growth or positive shift that took place for you personally, or in your business. Don’t be afraid to go deep with this. Let your audience know exactly how you felt, what you saw and heard, and how the transformation happened…

Don’t forget Element #4 from Chapter 3: The more specific your story, the more universal it becomes.

This is where you bring the story home. It’s where you bring the lesson, insight, idea or transformation back to the people who matter…

Your audience.

The End: Delivering Your Call to Action

When you reach the end of your story, transition — shift the spotlight — from yourself to your audience, with a message, statement, idea, sentence or question that inspires them to take action.

On sales pages and in promotional copywriting this is called the Call to Action or CTA.

A sales CTA is generally the “Buy Now” button or the “Sign up here” link that you see at the end of a page.

But CTAs aren’t just good for promotional copywriting, they’re great for all kinds of stories.

Here’s how I transitioned into my CTA, in the introduction to this Guide:

Stories heal. Stories bring people together… And when you use storytelling in your business, you’ll immediately start to build an authentic, meaningful relationship with your audience. A relationship based on shared goals, values, dreams and desires. A relationship based on mutual understanding and most importantly… Trust. Your stories are at the heart of your message and you simply can’t Live Your Message without them. But how do you write those stories? What are the types of stories you should share? How can you master business storytelling?

One of my most popular blog posts of all time is called OMG, I’m 40! Insights from 4 Decades on Planet Earth. It’s not a promo or sales post but a story I wrote from the heart, about my life experiences and what I’d learned from them.

The CTA was simple: What are YOUR biggest insights from being alive?

The post received over 400 comments and shares.

A great CTA gives your story direction and purpose and allows your audience to see a clear connection between your story and their daily lives. Make it your personal rule to include CTAs in all your stories.

Don’t have time to read this game-changing guide right this minute? Click here to download the PDF and read it anytime you want!


I truly hope you take action on what you’ve just learned about the power of story.

I’ve personally used the business storytelling tools and techniques I share in this Guide to become one of the world’s thought leaders in branding on the web and building highly profitable online platforms for 6-, 7- and 8-figure entrepreneurs all over the world.

At every possible point of contact online and off, my stories do the heavy lifting of “educating” my prospects about what I believe, how I do business, and the kind of prices I charge — way before we ever get on the phone or start emailing.

This Guide gives you a deep foundational understanding on how to write powerful, purposeful stories for your business, but if you’re ready for more…

If you’re craving to go deeper so you can learn step-by-step strategies and masterful storytelling methodologies that will have you writing business stories that establish you as the leader in your field, and that will make you standout like a beacon in a crowded, noisy marketplace…

Check out my Hidden Story Power program where I’ll show you exactly how to uncover, capture and express stories in a way that will create maximize impact and income in your business. You’ll learn how to use the power of story in your products, talks, emails, blog posts, videos and more, so you can build a successful business that’s aligned with your values and your message, just like I’ve done with Live Your Message.

As a special bonus, you’ll also be invited to Quarterly Story Celebrations, where you have 3-5 minutes to share your story and 3-5 minutes of personal feedback from me on how to make your story even more powerful.

Check out Hidden Story Power here.

Thank you for reading! Before you go, I’d love to know…

What is the most surprising thing you learned about storytelling for business from this post? Share in the comments 🙂

Love it? Hate it? Let me know...

  1. Virginia Reeves

    As always Marisa, you deliver your message so well. I have often been reluctant to share personal stories but when I do the response is always supportive. I especially like the future vision suggestion. Delivering hope for a future which brings the potential to gain even more is always a strong force. Thanks for all you share.

    Reply ·
    1. Marisa Murgatroyd

      Totally Virginia. The goal of your stories should always be to move someone towards a solution or a better place. Thanks for sharing!

      Reply ·
  2. Mor Maty Seck

    I understand that your customers first buy your image, your sensitivity of the story that you communicate to them. Thank you Merida, to let me know the need to transmit it well. Thank you also for your beautiful story.

    Reply ·
    1. Marisa Murgatroyd

      Yes! It’s all about building trust – when your audience sees that you are a real person and have similar experiences to their own, they are more likely to trust you and buy from you down the road.

      Reply ·
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About the Author Marisa Murgatroyd

Marisa is the founder of Live Your Message, where she turns entrepreneurs into Online Superheroes, and the creator of Start With You where she helps people just like you to discover the business they're meant to build, not just the business they can build. At 4’11 and a quarter, she’s called the shortest woman in marketing — and that doesn’t stop her from having huge ideas. She’s the “go to” brand builder for industry luminaries and heavyweights such as Justin Livingston, Callan Rush, Danny Iny, Alexis Neely and Susan Peirce Thompson. Marisa helps entrepreneurs create a business that is authentic and aligned with who they are, to empower them to turn up the dial on their “inner superhero”, so they can be the superhero to their tribe, as well as in their own lives.

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What's the Business You're Truly Meant to Build?

You have a purpose here on Earth that you’re supposed to fulfill. And certain people here to serve. Watch this Masterclass to discover the business you're meant to build & how to share it with the world.

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